Riccardo Paletti – Another black day in 1982…

13 June 1982, early afternoon at Montreal.

After the warm-up lap, 26 cars line up on the grid for the Canadian Grand Prix, eighth round of the 1982 F1 Championship. FISA starter Derek Ongaro holds the peloton a little longer than usual. When he finally switches on the red lights, poleman Didier Pironi weaves his hands frantically… with the wait, his Ferrari had overheated and the engine stalled. But it was too late to abort starting procedures, and on a flick of a second the lights become green. Everyone tries to swerve past the immobile Ferrari. Back on the peloton Boesel hits the rear tyre of Pironi, right behind the Brazilian, on his low driving position, young rookie Riccardo Paletti is deeply focused on the Osella rev counter, so he doesn’t see the obstacle and hit massively the Ferrari’s rear, sending it to the right side of the track and shrinking the front section of the Osella till the cockpit….

Caption of the crash (The Fastlane Forum)

Riccardo Paletti was the son of Gianna and Arietto Paletti, a wealthy Milanese building contractor and Pioneer Hi-Fi importer to Italy, and was born precisely in Milan on the 15th June, 1958. The young Riccardo was an accomplished sportsman since his youth, and with thirteen he was Italian junior karate champion, then switched to skiing, where he progressed to the National alpine skiing youth selection. Nevertheless his main aim was to follow the path of his father till, with nineteen, he decided to start a career on motor racing, so in 1978 his father invested 50,000 dollars on a campaign at the Italian Formula SuperFord Championship with an Osella, where Paletti proved immediately to be skillful, leading eighteen laps on his first races and being a regular podium visitor, even with no wins, which left him third on the standings.

Riccardo Paletti (Facebook)

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Alfonso García de Vinuesa – Fate takes it all

When Trollé took his sole F3000 win at the 1987 Spa-Francorchamps round, he was leading when the race was interrupted after a very nasty crash between Luis Pérez-Sala and Alfonso García de Vinuesa took place on the Raidillon. Both drivers were the most promising Spanish hotshots of their era, at a time where the Iberian country was almost completely peripheral concerning the highest levels of motor racing. After Alfonso de Portago, Spain provided just some odd entries in F1, till in 1987 Adrián Campos managed to grab a seat with Minardi, so both Pérez-Sala and de Vinuesa had real dreams of reaching F1 too. In fact, Pérez-Sala would drive and clearly outpace Campos at Minardi in 1988, but de Vinuesa seemed to vanish in the mist of history. Why? In fact, it was a life marked by such doom and tragedy that almost eclipsed his feats. Fate has never been so hard.

Alfonso García de Vinuesa (No Mirando a Nuestro Daño)

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Michel Trollé – The Brands day that changed everything

All of us know motor racing is dangerous…. And the number of drivers that saw their careers stopped or hampered due to serious accidents is quite high. The 1988 F3000 Championship was a good example of this, as three youngsters – Fabien Giroix, Michel Trollé and Johnny Herbert – suffered severe injuries on the usual high-attrition races of the main F1 feeder formula, and saw their careers changed forever. Trollé and Herbert were two of the biggest promises of the field, and if all we know what happened to Herbert, the Touquettois almost sank into oblivion… Time to remember and reevaluate his career.

Michel Trollé (Facebook)

Michel Trollé was born at Lens, on the 23rd June, 1959. His father used to drive a Renault 4 CV and then a Dauphiné on the thriving local rally scene during the fifties and sixties, so young Trollé caught the racing bug on his childhood, and as a teen used to travel – not always with permission – to nearby Belgium to see the races at Zolder. However, unlike his father, Michel always dreamt of racing and wanted to go karting, but his family found it too expensive so, while completing his studies, Trollé worked with his parents on a newshouse to raise money to buy a kart and then, first goal achieved, switched jobs to work for a friend in a restaurant. On the other hand, his friend was his mechanic… Continue reading

Richard Dallest – Talent is not enough

Wandering through the web on my researches, one theme that always captivated me were the unfulfilled promises, those men everyone said they’ll made it into F1, and by the end they just vanish on the fog, or build a career everywhere, mostly on sportscars, GT’s or cross the Atlantic to the fertile terrain of the USA racing scenario. In so many forums and pages, one name usually appeared: Richard Dallest. A Frenchman, like so many others, usually related to the small but affectionate AGS squad. And when I wrote the last piece on Patrick Gaillard, soon I saw a lot more about this man Dallest, and he can really be considered as a lost talent. But let’s travel back to Provence…

Richard Dallest (Facebook)

Richard Dallest came to this world in Marseille, 15th February 1951, from a middle-class family, and as far as his memory goes he was always very fond of playing with car miniatures. The southeast of France is a region known for his huge passion for motor racing, and there was a lot of racing and rallying there – even including a circuit in Parc Borely, Marseille, which hosted G.P. races between 1932 and 1952 – and, with ten, the young lad went to his first event, a hillclimb on the beautiful Provencal mountains. Meanwhile, Dallest’s father became involved on the car selling business, which surely helped the young boy to foster his interest in everything mechanical, jointly with his neighbour and close friend Gérard Bacle, slightly older than Richard and soon-to-be driver. Both teenagers did some races between themselves as soon as Dallest took his license in March of 1969, even if Richard didn’t pursue a career immediately. In fact, Dallest told Echappement Classic that he had several road accidents on his first months of driving, and only used to drive his Simca 1000 against his friend Bacle for pleasure, but gradually his passion grew on, and by 1972 he decided to switch to a Simca Rallye 1 and entered on some local hillclimbs, culminating with the Géant de Provence, the Mont Ventoux, where he won his class!! Continue reading

Patrick Gaillard – One Wrong Decision

There are some defining occasions in life. Vital decisions, job changes, unique opportunities, a special invitation… Like any other ‘job’ in the world, motor racing faces all these circumstances and, generally, career success depends on a multitude of factors. But what happens when, in different periods of your life, one of these countless factors has a tiny, little problem? It may have no consequences, hold back your progress, open another door, or… slowly erode your chances to be among the very great. Proof of it is a rather unknown Frenchman, Patrick Gaillard.

Patrick Gaillard (Google Images)

Patrick Gaillard was born in Paris on the 12th of February, 1952, and soon experienced the smell of petrol and rubber since his father had a garage to host his van and truck rental dealership. Perhaps that environment sparked the interest in mechanical sports, and in his early teens Gaillard made his debut on the thriving motorcycle racing scene, even reaching the French National Championship, where he occasionally rode a 350cc Honda. Young Patrick was a gifted driver and his parents didn’t quite disapprove of his career choice, but motorcycle racing was far more dangerous than four-wheeled racing, so they took the opportunity of his forced career interruption for military service to persuade him that, if he was to be a racing driver, at least he should switch to cars. Thus, in 1974, Gaillard enrolled at the Volant Winfield at Magny-Cours – precisely the year when support switched from Shell to Elf – he finished as a semi-finalist. It was a good way to start, above all because, unlike most of his opponents, he had no karting or any kind of other four-wheel background. Continue reading